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Map Illustrators

Editable City Map of Singapore

$77.00

Detailed Singapore City Map In Vector File Format

Edit this accurate map in your own design software, like Adobe Illustrator. Your topographic plan at street level contains editable layers for each cartographic category like roads, buildings, rivers, points of interests et cetera. This Singapore City Vector Map includes not only the city centre, but the suburbs as well. 

Only accept the most accurate map. Therefore, we take one working day to incorporate the latest changes in a city map. This is what makes Map Illustrators stand out from other suppliers.

Specifications of the Vector Singapore City Map

  • File format: Adobe Illustrator CC, other file formats like .jpg, .pdf, .png or .eps are available on request
  • File size: 15 MB
  • Scale: 1:15.000
  • Publishing date: 2017
  • Online delivery period: 24 hours / by downloadable link

Benefits

  • Save money: save tremendous time and money designing or printing your own city map
  • No surprises: up-to-date, complete and high-resolution cartography
  • High quality: scale, crop or zoom to virtually any size without loss in detail or quality
  • Copyright free: buy once, use as much as possible
  • No risk: 30 days money back guarantee, no questions, no hassle 

Singapore facts

Singapore consists of 63 islands, including the main island, Pulau Ujong. There are two man-made connections to Johor, Malaysia: the Johor–Singapore Causeway in the north and the Tuas Second Link in the west. Jurong Island, Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin and Sentosa are the largest of Singapore's smaller islands. The highest natural point is Bukit Timah Hill at 163.63 m (537 ft). Ongoing land reclamation projects have increased Singapore's land area from 581.5 km2 (224.5 sq mi) in the 1960s to 719.1 km2 (277.6 sq mi) in 2015, an increase of some 23% (130 km2). The country is projected to grow by another 100 km2 (40 sq mi) by 2030. Some projects involve merging smaller islands through land reclamation to form larger, more functional islands, as has been done with Jurong Island. Singapore's urbanisation means that it has lost 95% of its historical forests, and now over half of the naturally occurring fauna and flora in Singapore is present in nature reserves, such as the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve and the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, which comprise only 0.25% of Singapore's land area. To combat this decline, in 1967 the government introduced the vision of making Singapore a "garden city" aiming to soften the harshness of urbanisation and improve the quality of life. Since then, nearly 10% of Singapore's land has been set aside for parks and nature reserves.The government also has plans to preserve the remaining wildlife. Singapore was ranked fourth in the 2014 Environmental Performance Index, which measures the effectiveness of state policies for environmental sustainability.


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